WISHH Ambassador: October 2014

Welcome to the Fall Issue of the WISHH Ambassador

October 2014

The American Soybean Association’s World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) program offers exciting updates on the world of soy nutrition and global development. For your convenience, this newsletter offers live links to useful resources and a forward-to-a-friend feature so you can share this newsletter with others.

Want to talk to someone about WISHH’s work? Click HERE!


Liberian Women Manufacture Soy-Fortified Cassava Cereal

Children, Pregnant and Lactating Women Gain Nutrition

Liberia Photo 1

With U.S. Agency for International Development support, WISHH assisted Liberian women who continue to produce soy-fortified Super Gari at two factories. Importantly, the factories offer nutrition as well as jobs.

October 2 – While global experts work to forecast the impact of the Ebola outbreak on food security, more than 80 Liberian women remain focused on producing soy-fortified “SuperGari” in two factories that WISHH helped them establish. Super-Gari offers protein and other important nutrition that is not in the widely consumed traditional gari cereal. Both traditional and Super-Gari are made from locally grown cassava, but SuperGari includes defatted soy flour and a vitamin/mineral mix. Super Gari offers greater nutrition for diverse programs. Currently, it is primarily offered at clinics and is used for children, and pregnant and lactating women.

Liberian women found new jobs at the two factories that manufacture the SuperGari as well as allow them to use the equipment to produce for their families. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding of the Health, Agriculture and Nutrition Development for Sustainability (HANDS) program provided the resources for Opportunities Industrialization Centers International and WISHH to establish the factories. Built in 2011, the first factory is in Zwedru, Liberia. Liberia Photo 2It has expanded to employ approximately 40 people. In 2013, construction began for a second factory in Fishtown, located in the adjoining county. The Fishtown factory started production in 2014. WISHH has also developed a SuperGari production manual and more to assist the women on quality control, food safety and other important skills. In addition to the SuperGari processing, WISHH has implemented nutrition and aquaculture activities in Liberia.


 

Poultry Feed Boosts the Market for Soybeans in Afghanistan

Poultry feeding trial successes have Afghan farmers turning to more soybean meal-based feeds for their birds. The farmers are finding economic advantages because poultry eat less feed but grow faster with the first commercial soybean meal manufactured in Afghanistan. These poultry farmers are among the hundreds of Afghans benefiting from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded Soybeans for Agricultural Renewal in Afghanistan Initiative (SARAI) project with WISHH. SARAI links poultry and other Afghan farmers into an entire agricultural value chain.

Now in its fourth year, the multi-faceted SARAI project has exceeded or is on track to meet each of the original objectives established for the project. Objectives include: rehabilitate rural roads and irrigation systems, provide micro-credit to farmers and other small business owners/entrepreneurs, build and successfully establish a soy processing plant, and introduce soybean production techniques to farmers.

 

Dr. Mohamed El- Sherif, a longtime feed and livestock consultant, provided Afghan poultry farmers with recommendations on the use of soybean meal for their flocks. The farmers found economic benefits because poultry eat less feed but grow faster with the first commercial soybean meal manufactured in Afghanistan.

Dr. Mohamed El- Sherif, a longtime feed and livestock consultant, provided Afghan poultry farmers with recommendations on the use of soybean meal for their flocks. The farmers found economic benefits because poultry eat less feed but grow faster with the first commercial soybean meal manufactured in Afghanistan.

In the 2014 crop year, the SARAI project has introduced two pieces of equipment that are designed for the local community needs. First, mechanical planters are reducing the physical labor and time that also cuts yields and crop quality. In previous growing seasons, the farmers had planted their 1 acre or smaller equivalents by hand. Second, stationary threshers will replace sticks and pitch forks used at harvest that were labor intensive and damaged the soybeans. The stationary threshers are now available for the fall harvest and will reduce post-harvest loss.

For the fourth year in a row, the SARAI project has made it possible for Afghan farmers to grow soybeans as a second crop following their wheat. In 2014 alone, WISHH and agronomists have conducted more than 60 field days where farmers are pleased to share the results of their own soybean plots as well as learn weed control and more.

For the fourth year in a row, the SARAI project has made it possible for Afghan farmers to grow soybeans as a second crop following their wheat. In 2014 alone, WISHH and agronomists have conducted more than 60 field days where farmers are pleased to share the results of their own soybean plots as well as learn weed control and more.

Click HERE to learn more about the SARAI project.


Central American Meat, Dairy and Baked Foods Includes Soy for Nutrition and Economic Value

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Foreign Agriculture Service and state soybean checkoff boards provided funding to WISHH for multiple trainings in Central America this summer.

Sergio Serna

Dr. Sergio Serna explains the advantages of adding soy flour to bread during a short course in Guatemala City, Guatemala.

In Nicaragua, more than 30 people attended WISHH’s baking seminar, held at the National School of Hospitality. The Honorable Phyllis M. Powers, U.S. Ambassador to Nicaragua, inaugurated the event where Dr. Sergio Serna helped trainees incorporate soy flour into traditional Nicaraguan breads. Participants witnessed the advantages (increased yield, improved texture and improved nutritional value) of adding soy flour up to 6 percent of the wheat flour in the dough.

Read the full article HERE.


USDA FEEDing Pakistan Project Convenes Pakistan’s First International Aquaculture Conference

WISHH co-hosted Pakistan’s first international aquaculture conference, drawing approximately 200 attendees. Organized with Kansas State University (KSU) as part of the USDA-funded FEEDing Pakistan project, the conference and its 20 speakers featured feeding demonstrations held on fish farms throughout Pakistan, and introduced soy-based, extruded, floating fish feed and commercial Tilapia production to Pakistani fish farmers. The farmers have reported faster growth rates in fish eating the soy-based food. Pakistan has an extensive system of fish farming, but no commercial, soy-based, floating fish feeds were produced in the country until FEEDing Pakistan.

The Governor of Punjab Province, Mr. Mohammad Sarwar, feeds locally produced extruded, soy-based fish feed, with U.S. soybean meal, to tilapia during a demonstration at the conference.

The Governor of Punjab Province, Mr. Mohammad Sarwar, feeds locally produced extruded, soy-based fish feed, with U.S. soybean meal, to tilapia during a demonstration at the conference.

Earlier this year, WISHH brought Dr. John Woiwode, who has extensive experience working with fisheries in Pakistan, to provide one-on-one technical assistance to Pakistani fish farmers and feed millers. He presented at farmer field days as well as at a seminar titled, “Best Management Practices for the Culture of Tilapia.” The seminar included discussions surrounding the use of soy-based extruded feeds for aquaculture.


WISHH Hosts Cochran Fellows: Training Assists School Nutrition Programs Around the World

USDA Cochran Program-sponsored fellows wrap hamburgers at the Eliot Hine Middle School in Washington DC. They learned that the burgers have a significant percentage of soy protein. In fact, when the food service switched to all beef, the kids noticed the difference and complained, wanting the original recipe!

USDA Cochran Program-sponsored fellows wrap hamburgers at the Eliot Hine Middle School in Washington DC. They learned that the burgers have a significant percentage of soy protein. In fact, when the food service switched to all beef, the kids noticed the difference and complained, wanting the original recipe!

WISHH led U.S-based training for 14 representatives from nine countries involved in different aspects of school nutrition. Participants included representatives from food companies, private voluntary organizations as well as national government school feeding programs in Latin American and Africa. USDA’s Cochran Fellowship Program funded the training. Participants learned about the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program as well as the U.S. School Nutrition program. WISHH also introduced the Cochran fellows to other organizations, like the World Cocoa Foundation, American Peanut Council, and DuPont Nutrition and Health, as well as took them to the INTSOY Course at the National Soybean Research Laboratory.

See more about this training and WISHH’s many other trainings HERE.


Soybean Growers Tapped to Lead ASA/WISHH

American Soybean Association (ASA) President Ray Gaesser has confirmed the election of new leaders that make up the ASA’s WISHH Committee in 2014-2015. Among the 15 soybean growers from 11 states are the new officers: Chairman Andy Welden of Michigan; Vice Chair Lucas Heinen of Kansas; Treasurer Monica McCranie of South Dakota; and Secretary Dean Coleman of Iowa.

Other WISHH Committee Members include: Gary Berg, Daryl Cates and Jeff Lynn of Illinois; Ron Bunjer of Minnesota; Ryan Cahoon of North Carolina; Bret Davis and Keith Roberts of Ohio; John Heisdorffer of Iowa; Levi Huffman of Indiana; Jack Trumbo of Kentucky; Art Wosick of North Dakota. U.S. Soybean Export Committee Manager Marypat Corbett is an ex-officio member. Gaesser also recognized David Iverson of South Dakota and Dan Farney of Illinois who completed their terms on the WISHH committee.

Click HERE for more details.


Why WISHH’s Work Matters

Six of the many reasons why WISHH’s work on affordable, available, nutritious and delicious food and feed is so important:

  1. The 2014 “State of Food Insecurity in the World” report.The good news: the FAO Picturenumber of people in the world that are chronically malnourished has fallen by over 100 million people in the last 10 years, with 63 countries reaching the hunger target set by the first U.N. Millennium Development Goal (MDG). But more work is needed: 805 million people-1 in 9 on the planet–are still chronically undernourished.
  2. The current eight Millennium Development Goals expire in 2015. Nutrition is a big discussion for the Post-2015 agenda.
  3. WISHH and more than 85 like-minded groups are part of the 1000 Days infographicMovement that recognizes the importance of reducing stunting in children. Globally 1 in 4 children under the age of 5 is stunted.
  4. FAO “Understanding Hunger and Malnutrition” Reminds to Eat Protein;  the FAO infographic includes “eat legumes regularly,” as well as “eat meat, poultry, eggs and fish regularly.”
  5. Annual income spent on food is highlighted by country in Washington State University’s infographic based on Wash State Food Income GraphUSDA data.  Soy is an affordable, available, nutritious and delicious protein source.
  6. Ebola-related fears disrupt markets and livelihoods; elevated levels of food insecurity expected.

WISHH is headquartered at the American Soybean Association in St. Louis. Since America’s soybean farmers founded WISHH in 2000, WISHH has worked in 24 countries to improve diets as well as encourage growth of food industries. For more information about WISHH, please explore more of our website, www.wishh.org, or check out our YouTube channel HERE.

Comments are closed