WISHH Ambassador: May 2012

The American Soybean Association’s World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) program offers exciting updates on the world of soy nutrition and global development. For your convenience, this newsletter offers live links to useful resources.

WISHH and WSF Host Nutrition and Development Conference in D.C.

WISHH and the World Soy Foundation (WSF) hosted approximately 125 international development and nutrition leaders on March 15 in Washington, D.C., for the Nutrition and Development Conference “Delivering Quality Global Nutrition: Farm to Food.”
Attendees included representatives of the U.S. government, international development and nutrition organizations, as well as companies and farmer leaders. Topics covered how soy provides quality nutrition for developing countries, particularly children, as well as how soy plays an important role in their food value chains.
Review presentations and view event photos.

World Food Prize winner Per Pinstrup-Andersen was the keynote speaker at the nutrition and development conference. Other speakers included U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Acting Administrator of the Foreign Agricultural Service Suzanne Heinen and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Director of Food Security’s Office of Agricultural Research and Transformation Rob Betram.

World Food Prize winner Per Pinstrup-Andersen was the keynote speaker at the nutrition and development conference. Other speakers included U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Acting Administrator of the Foreign Agricultural Service Suzanne Heinen and U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Director of Food Security’s Office of Agricultural Research and Transformation Rob Betram.

Program Committee Farmers Roll Up Sleeves in Leading WISHH

WISHH is led by 17 soybean farmers from across the nation, and they are active in WISHH’s many programs. On March 14, the WISHH Program Committee met so the farmers could discuss WISHH’s program development progress.
WISHH also welcomed Mary Lou Smith of Michigan as the new United Soybean Board representative to the WISHH Committee.
See the entire list of WISHH Program Committee Members

WISHH Program Committee Members Randy Van Kooten and Mary Lou Smith joined the WISHH March meeting as well as participated alongside private voluntary organization representatives in the cooking with soy training held at the Nutrition and Development conference on March 15.

WISHH Program Committee Members Randy Van Kooten and Mary Lou Smith joined the WISHH March meeting as well as participated alongside private voluntary organization representatives in the cooking with soy training held at the Nutrition and Development conference on March 15.

WISHH Builds Markets for Soy in Central America

Nine representatives of five state soybean organizations joined WISHH in Nicaragua and Guatemala in February where they witnessed the demand for soy protein in Central America.
“Nicaragua and Guatemala import over 90% of their soy from the US, which amounts to approximately 422,971 metric tons of soy product,” said Art Wosick, Minto, ND, soybean farmer on the trip. “Witnessing the expansion of U.S. soybean usage into emerging markets like Nicaragua and Guatemala makes me feel proud of the work of WISHH and the soybean checkoff, and proud to be a US soybean farmer,” continued Wosick. “I feel the WISHH program and their work is a great investment of my checkoff dollars and am very optimistic that more U.S. soy will be going to Central America.”
Throughout the trip, farmer leaders participated in various market development visits with:

  • Companies importing U.S. soy products in Nicaragua and Guatemala
  • Café Soluble, Alimentos, and other companies working with WISHH to use U.S. soy in products sold locally
  • U.S. government officials in the region
  • Importers and distributors of U.S. soy with vast growth and demand potential
  • Soy distributors and processors

“I was impressed that there seems to be a general acceptance and that people want to use U.S. soy in particular,” said Dan Farney, Morton, Ill., soybean farmer who serves on the WISHH Program Committee as well as volunteers on the World Soy Foundation board of directors. “It seems Central American companies realize that if they use U.S. soy they will be able to improve their products. WISHH education is working.”

Central America Stats
  • Nicaragua and Guatemala have a population of more than 20 million, which is greater than the populations of North Dakota, Kentucky, Kansas and North Carolina combined.
  • Guatemala was the 9th largest buyer of US soybean meal in 2010, with $106 million in purchases, according to ASA Soy Stats®.
  • The 2007 Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) has strengthened trade between the US and Nicaragua, Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala and the Dominican Republic.

Farmer leaders also attended a two-day WSF and Cargill-supported “Nutrition Solutions for Central America” conference in Managua, Nicaragua. More than 140 people attended the conference, including representatives from several Central American government offices, the World Food Program, the U.S. Embassy, local nonprofit leaders and nutrition experts.
North Dakota’s Wosick adds, “I am astonished at the amount of work that is being done to implement soy protein into malnourished kids’ diets.”
Dan Farney of Illinois said, “The trip was a confirmation that support of the World Soy Foundation is the right thing. They realize they need protein and to improve the diets of the children. We need to keep doing our part.”
For more information, go to www.worldsoyfoundation.org

During their time in Nicaragua and Guatemala, the nine U.S. soybean representatives from Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, North Carolina and North Dakota met with companies that use U.S. soy. The group toured a facility manufacturing packaged food items for the United Nation’s World Food Programme.

During their time in Nicaragua and Guatemala, the nine U.S. soybean representatives from Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, North Carolina and North Dakota met with companies that use U.S. soy. The group toured a facility manufacturing packaged food items for the United Nation’s World Food Programme.

SARAI Soy Value Chain Grows in Afghanistan

WISHH’s Soybeans for Agricultural Renewal in Afghanistan Initiative (SARAI) reports new milestones in the work to build a soybean value chain in Afghanistan.
The new Afghan agricultural trade association to promote oil crops launches at a signing ceremony with Afghanistan’s Ambassador to the U.S. Eklil Ahmad Hakimi, USDA Foreign Agricultural Service Acting Administrator Suzanne Heinen, WISHH Executive Director Jim Hershey and the association’s chairman Abdul Ghafoor.
Read full news release
The Oil Crops Growers Association of Afghanistan will directly help the soybean farmers that WISHH, through the SARAI project, worked with last year.
Watch a video clip about last year’s soybean planting season in Afghanistan.

Michigan, Ohio and Afghan soybeans were used in Afghanistan’s first soybean processing center. A major milestone for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded SARAI project in 2011 was the establishment of Afghanistan’s first soy processing center with a 5000-metric ton annual capacity. The processor purchased the crop grown by the farmers in the Afghanistan project. The plant is also using 1,500 metric tons of USDA-purchased soybeans from Perdue Grain & Oilseed facilities in Michigan and Ohio.

Military transport again airlifts soybean seeds as Afghan farmers prepare for 2012 crop. Thanks again to the support of the U.S. military, soybean seeds have arrived for planting in Afghanistan. Last year, 1000 Afghan farmers, including 91 women, produced the country’s first commercial crop of soybeans on a total of 500 acres with the soybean seeds that arrived via military transport. The Department of Defense has again assisted the SARAI project for the 2012 crop: 40 metric tons of Stine 3300 soybean seeds arrived by US military flight to Kabul and then trucked to their final destination of men and women farmers in Dashti Qala in northeastern Afghanistan.

Afghanistan’s Ambassador to the U.S. Eklil Ahmad Hakimi (right) shakes hands with WISHH Executive Director Jim Hershey following the signing ceremony at the Afghan Embassy to launch a new agricultural trade association to promote oil crops for food and feed in Afghanistan. USDA Foreign Agricultural Service Acting Administrator Suzanne Heinen witnessed the signing of the agreement that is supported by USDA. Also looking on is OCGAA chairman Abdul Ghafoor.

Afghanistan’s Ambassador to the U.S. Eklil Ahmad Hakimi (right) shakes hands with WISHH Executive Director Jim Hershey following the signing ceremony at the Afghan Embassy to launch a new agricultural trade association to promote oil crops for food and feed in Afghanistan. USDA Foreign Agricultural Service Acting Administrator Suzanne Heinen witnessed the signing of the agreement that is supported by USDA. Also looking on is OCGAA chairman Abdul Ghafoor.

WISHH and SALT International worked with an Afghan bakery company to open Afghanistan’s first soy processing facility in 2011. Afghan men are now trained to operate the soybean extruder that is crushing Afghan as well as U.S. soybeans.

WISHH and SALT International worked with an Afghan bakery company to open Afghanistan’s first soy processing facility in 2011. Afghan men are now trained to operate the soybean extruder that is crushing Afghan as well as U.S. soybeans.

To prepare for the 2012 crop, Afghan farmers braved the cold to meet WISHH Asia Program Manager Lynn Engstrand when she and the Shelter for Life field team arrived in February. Engstrand presented this letter from ASA President Steve Wellman who congratulated the farmers on their successful 2011 soybean crop.

To prepare for the 2012 crop, Afghan farmers braved the cold to meet WISHH Asia Program Manager Lynn Engstrand when she and the Shelter for Life field team arrived in February. Engstrand presented this letter from ASA President Steve Wellman who congratulated the farmers on their successful 2011 soybean crop.

SARAI elected a new 19-member farmer leadership committee. Following meetings between ASA’s WISHH, Shelter for Life and the District Governor of Dashti Qala Region of Takhar Province, a new 19-member SARAI Soy Committee was formed. This committee, consisting of 17 male and two female farmers, will facilitate SARAI project communications and recruit 4,000 new farmers for crop year 2012.

WISHH Hosts Feed Training Mission for Southern Africans

WISHH organized a training mission to the United States for 10 feed manufacturing and poultry company representatives from four Southern African countries on March 5-9. The effort is part of WISHH’s work with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Southern Africa Trade Hub (SATH).
For the first time, participants received U.S. feed mill training because WISHH understand the importance of hands-on learning and the impact of seeing state-of-the-art feed manufacturing and laboratory facilities.
The participating companies account for 90% of commercial poultry and feed producers in the Southern Africa area, according to SATH, and were from: Malawi, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia.
WISHH started the trip in Washington, D.C. where participants met with the American Feed Industry Association and the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the Food and Drug Administration. They then traveled to Kansas State University’s International Grains Program facility for a one-week training on feed manufacturing. In addition to tours of local facilities and laboratories, presentations included feed mill design, management, use and maintenance.
“The course covered a wide spectrum of very important subjects, and the diversity in the group attending the course insured an insight into a very wide range of topics. The course presenters were very helpful in answering questions, and the visits to the factories were impressive,” said Cillié Taljaard of Extru Feeds in South Africa. “I am currently involved in the extrusion of soy and maize, and therefore I found the extrusion part of the course most interesting and relevant to my daily business. The energy-saving techniques were also something that I could apply to my current daily manufacturing processes.”
In addition to the planned presentations and tour visits, WISHH arranged additional tours of the Kansas State University dairy, sheep and goat units at the request of the participants.
USAID’s Southern Africa Trade Hub (SATH) works to increase international competitiveness, intra-regional trade, and food security in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. SATH delivers targeted technical assistance to governments, the private sector, and civil society organizations in support of advancing regional integration and increasing the trade capacity of selected value chains within Southern Africa.

During a tour of the feed manufacturing operations of Midwest Ag Services in Seneca, Kan., participants learned about manufacturing various soy-based feed products. This knowledge could potentially aid the Southern Africans by increasing the number of products manufactured for customers or the types of feed they use in their poultry operations.

During a tour of the feed manufacturing operations of Midwest Ag Services in Seneca, Kan., participants learned about manufacturing various soy-based feed products. This knowledge could potentially aid the Southern Africans by increasing the number of products manufactured for customers or the types of feed they use in their poultry operations.

SOY packs the protein power!

April was National Soyfoods Month and the National Soybean Research Laboratory (NSRL) at the University of Illinois encouraged everyone to explore new ways to incorporate healthy soyfoods into their daily diets. Soyfoods are an easy way to enhance protein and provide a convenient alternative that lowers the saturated fat and cholesterol in many recipes.
WISHH works year round with food manufacturers, livestock producers and aquaculture farms to increase the use of U.S. soy protein to improve the health and well-being of the world’s protein deficient.
Soy’s biggest nutritional claim to fame is the fact that it is a complete protein, one of the only plant proteins that contains all nine essential amino acids that our bodies need to function properly. A ½ cup of cooked soybeans supplies about 1/3 of a person’s necessary daily protein. That protein is incredibly filling. Plus, soybeans are cholesterol-free, low in saturated fat, and provide important Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids. Soybeans are also a great source of fiber and are rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. A single glass of soymilk contains over 6 grams of protein and is lactose free.
Soy offers many health benefits and that is positively impacting the popularity and use of soy. Eating soy may also help in the prevention of certain illnesses such as heart disease, kidney disease, cancers, osteoporosis and diabetes. Soy foods are an excellent choice for weight management as protein helps delay feelings of hunger.
The history of soybeans has its roots in China as early as the 11th Century and it is known as one of the first crops grown by man. The first soybean plants came to North America in 1765 and as they say, the rest is history. Today, 3.06 billion bushels of soybeans are produced in the U.S. and they take on many forms after harvest and processing. Some examples include soy meal, soy flour, soymilk, tofu, textured soy protein and soy oil.
Learn more at: www.soyfoodsmonth.org

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