WISHH Ambassador: March 2014

The American Soybean Association’s World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (ASA/WISHH) program offers exciting updates on the world of soy nutrition and global development.

FEEDing Pakistan Grows Fish and Common Ground

Everest, Kansas soybean farmer Lucas Heinen was surprised at how much he had in common with the Pakistani aquaculture-industry representatives he met at Kansas State University (KSU) last year. Heinen, a Kansas Soybean Association director and ASA WISHH committee secretary, again visited with Pakistani aquaculture leaders in February during USDA-supported training at KSU’s International Grains Program.

Read how FEEDing Pakistan benefits both countries.

Mr. Khan of Himalaya Fish Farm in Punjab shows a soy-fed tilapia to ASA/WISHH Pakistan Country Representative R.S.N. Janjua and farmers at a FEEDing Pakistan field day. In 2012, Khan participated in the USDA-supported training at Kansas State University (KSU) and has since trained other farmers on how to grow bigger fish with soy-based floating fish feed manufactured in Pakistan by Oryza Organics. A representative of Oryza also attended the 2012 U.S.-based training, which led to the company purchasing feed-extrusion equipment from Extru-Tech in Kansas and formally inaugurating Pakistan's first extruder for the production of floating fish feed in July 2013.

Mr. Khan of Himalaya Fish Farm in Punjab shows a soy-fed tilapia to ASA/WISHH Pakistan Country Representative R.S.N. Janjua and farmers at a FEEDing Pakistan field day. In 2012, Khan participated in the USDA-supported training at Kansas State University (KSU) and has since trained other farmers on how to grow bigger fish with soy-based floating fish feed manufactured in Pakistan by Oryza Organics. A representative of Oryza also attended the 2012 U.S.-based training, which led to the company purchasing feed-extrusion equipment from Extru-Tech in Kansas and formally inaugurating Pakistan’s first extruder for the production of floating fish feed in July 2013.

Kansas Soybean Association leaders met with the FEEDing Pakistan aquaculture delegation in February and discussed how the project uses U.S. soy in Pakistan, the sixth most populous country in the world.

Kansas Soybean Association leaders met with the FEEDing Pakistan aquaculture delegation in February and discussed how the project uses U.S. soy in Pakistan, the sixth most populous country in the world.

Read the All About Feed feature on the overall USDA project.

WISHH Partners Develop 47 New Soy Foods and Feeds in 2013

WISHH supply chain partners developed an exciting array of 47 new soy foods and feeds, ranging from fortified-breakfast foods for Central American diets to fish feed in Asia.

Additional 2013 successes include:

  • 305 companies committed to further research and development using soy for commercial applications.
  • 455 food and feed processors gained understanding of the advantages and potential of soy proteins
  • 239 technical consultations and demonstrations enhanced efficiency and quality in the use of soy
  • 64 seminars helped improve agricultural chains leading to nutrition
NEF fortified-breakfast drink made with soy by Alimentos in Guatemala

NEF fortified-breakfast drink made with soy by Alimentos in Guatemala

Hot chocolate made with soy by Paxa in El Salvador

Hot chocolate made with soy by Paxa in El Salvador

Soy cereal made by Futuro Vivo in Guatemala

Soy cereal made by Futuro Vivo in Guatemala

Soy-Based Cereal Success Spreads

Optifoods Model Identifies Incaparina for Cost-Effective Nutrition

Alimentos S.A’s portfolio of soy-based foods grows. At the same time, recognition increases for the nutrition-on-a-budget benefits of their widely popular Incaparina™, a soy flour-based cereal with iron, zinc and vitamins. Read the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) blog.
It describes USAID’s Feed the Future efforts, which used the Optifood computer software model to identify nutrient gaps in local Guatemalan diets as well as food combinations to affordably fill dietary needs. Incaparina is one of the locally available foods identified for children.
In December, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office granted a trademark to Incaparina™. The soy-based food’s popularity continues with Latin American communities who reside in the United States. Read more (link to article below that is in Arial font) about how USDA support of WISHH, including through the USDA Cochran Program, has increased Alimentos’ use of soy to improve nutrition.

From left: Illinois Soybean Association Directors Duane Dahlman and David Droste discuss Alimentos S.A.’s many U.S. soy-based foods with Alimentos’ Oscar Tercero, Paola Escobar and Alan Ayapan.

From left: Illinois Soybean Association Directors Duane Dahlman and David Droste discuss Alimentos S.A.’s many U.S. soy-based foods with Alimentos’ Oscar Tercero, Paola Escobar and Alan Ayapan.

During the last decade, WISHH has cultivated a relationship with Alimentos, S.A. in Guatemala City, Guatemala. USDA Foreign Agricultural Service personnel in Guatemala and Washington, D.C. have supported the initiation and maintenance of this important relationship with a company that processes approximately 10,000 metric tons of U.S. soy per year.
USDA’s Market Access Program (MAP) has funded technical assistance visits to Guatemala for work with this large food processor. Through its partnership with Alimentos, WISHH has hosted technical trainings on the creation of snack foods utilizing U.S. soy products, and has participated with Alimentos in meetings on the use of soy in school lunch and public sector nutrition programs.
In 2012, Alimentos’ New Product Development Manager, Paola Escobar, attended WISHH’s Midwest Soy Protein Workshop entitled “Improving School Nutrition”, funded through USDA’s Cochran program. The University of Illinois’ National Soybean Research Laboratory hosted the workshop and gave participants the opportunity to explore new strategies to address improving school nutrition programs. Attendees of the conference represented private voluntary organizations, government officials, and international food companies – including processors from Africa and Central America.
Members of the Cochran delegation spent a week before the workshop in Washington, D.C. where USDA officials met with them. They also toured a public-school lunch program, met with private-sector food and industry representatives, attended a school nutrition workshop and an international school feeding briefing at the U.S. Capitol.
Through the Cochran program, Escobar met Reynaldo Sanchez – the representative from the Fabretto Children’s Foundation’s Food Security and Nutrition Program in Nicaragua. The two discussed their organizations’ missions at the workshop and found synergies they had never before considered. Once they had returned to their respective countries, Fabretto invited Alimentos to participate in the National Food Security Expo in Managua, Nicaragua.
Alimentos buys U.S. soy flour, which they process into textured soy protein (TSP) at their plant in Guatemala and then sell throughout Central America.At the Food Security Expo, Alimentos hosted tasting of their TSP while Fabretto staff introduced them to representatives of the World Food Program, disaster relief organizations and others engaged in food security discussions in the country. Alimentos was able to offer their high-protein products (TSP and Incaparina – a micronutrient-fortified corn-soy blend also made with U.S. soy flour) to these organizations to help them meet the needs of the Nicaraguan people. USDA’s Cochran Program made these connections possible. These new relationships could have lasting impacts for Central America through locally made high-protein foods and beverages, as well as continue to increase U.S. soy exports.
In addition, when Escobar returned to Guatemala she was able to meet with members of Alimentos’ sales and nutrition teams, which had drafted a proposal to the Guatemalan government for the country’s school feeding program. Escobar gave her team concrete ways to improve the proposal – skills she had learned at WISHH’s Midwest Soy Protein Workshop funded through the Cochran program.
The important relationships WISHH maintains, and which USDA funding supports, with local companies like Alimentos ensure that developing country partners have the technical support needed to continue to create products that address the regional protein needs in a commercially sustainable fashion, while also increasing U.S. soy export levels.

Soy-Fortified Cassava Processing Expands in Liberia

Thanks to the USAID-HANDS program, a second “Super Gari” processing facility is under construction in Liberia to offer the fortified blended food made with local cassava. U.S. defatted soy flour adds much-need protein. Opportunities Industrialization Centers International and WISHH are working with both facilities that will manufacture the Super Gari to improve nutrition in diverse programs, ranging from school feeding to food-for-work and clinics. In 2012, the processing facility in Zwedru, Liberia expanded to employ approximately 40 people. In 2013, construction began in Fishtown, located in the adjoining county.

Super Gari production creates nutritious local food as well as jobs

Super Gari production creates nutritious local food as well as jobs

Super Gari

Super Gari

Why WISHH’s Work Matters

Here are four reasons why WISHH’s work on affordable, available, nutritious and delicious foods and feed is so important.
  • The U.S. Government is working towards the World Health Assembly’s 2025 targets for improved maternal, infant, and young child nutrition, as well as the overarching goals in the Global Nutrition for Growth Compact. USAID is leading this important whole-of-government strategy that recognizes the essential role that nutrition plays in individuals’ and countries’ development. It addresses three high-level goals—child stunting, wasting, and women’s anemia. Read more details.
  • The new “Cost of Hunger in Uganda” study includes “10 Things Everyone Should Know about Child Under Nutrition in Uganda”
    • Today, 1 out of every 3 children in Uganda are stunted
    • As many as 82 percent of all cases of child undernutrition and its related pathologies go untreated
    • 44 percent of health costs associated with undernutrition occur before the child turns 1 year old
    • 15 percent of all child mortality cases in Uganda are associated with undernutrition
    • 7 percent of repetitions in school are associated with stunting
    • Stunted children have 1.2 years less in school education
    • Child mortality associated with under nutrition has reduced Uganda’s workforce by 4 percent
    • 54 percent of the adult population in Uganda suffered from stunting as children
    • The annual costs associated with child undernutrition are estimated at 1.8 trillion UGX, which is the equivalent to 5.6 percent of GDP
    • Eliminating stunting in Uganda is a necessary step for sustained development in the country

    Read the full report

  • Better livestock diets could combat climate change and improve food security.A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that within the current systems, farmers would find it more profitable in coming years to expand livestock production in mixed systems–where livestock are fed on both grass as well as higher quality feed-rather than in pure grass-based systems.WISHH currently has livestock feed projects underway in Afghanistan and Mongolia and is implementing a USDA study on the poultry feed sector in three West African countries.
  • “Fish farming will provide close to two thirds of global food fish consumption by 2030 as catches from wild capture fisheries level off and demand from an emerging global middle class substantially increases …” says a report released in February entitled ‘Fish to 2030: Prospects for Fisheries and Aquaculture,’ a collaboration between the World Bank, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). Read the full story on WISHH’s FEEDing Pakistan aquaculture.

Comments are closed